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How do you get people to understand their injury without giving up hope?

How do you get people to understand their injury without giving up hope?

Guy W. Fried, MD

Chief Medical Officer, Magee Rehabilitation Hospital, Philadelphia

Read Bio More Videos by Guy W. Fried
Transcript
I think its okay to have false hope.  I think it’s okay to kind of mix that with reality.  It’s all stirred together in the same paint.  There’s no one that I know on this planet who doesn’t have false hope, we ... Show More

I think its okay to have false hope.  I think it’s okay to kind of mix that with reality.  It’s all stirred together in the same paint.  There’s no one that I know on this planet who doesn’t have false hope, we all have false hope.  We all have our wishes, our unlikely things; we buy the lottery tickets.  It’s terrifically unlikely that anyone we know is going to win the lottery, but we all buy lottery tickets.  We all go gambling, we all do many, many things, it’s not a problem.  It’s accepted just as long as you’re taking it as a piece, but you’re willing to work on the reality of today, I’m fine with it.  To just say, “Okay, I want to walk, but I’m in a wheelchair today.  Fine.  What am I going to do?  I’m not just going to sit here and wait for my legs to move.  I’m going to decide to go back to school, or I’m going to do something.  I’m going to work on my strengthening, I’m going to read.  I’m going to try to benefit, I’m going to participate in my family’s activities, I’m going to pay attention to my kids.  I’m going to do something to move forward with my life.  Something that makes me feel better or more whole.”

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How do you get people to understand their injury without giving up hope?

Guy W. Fried, MD

Chief Medical Officer, Magee Rehabilitation Hospital, Philadelphia

More Videos by Guy W. Fried
Transcriptadd

I think its okay to have false hope.  I think it’s okay to kind of mix that with reality.  It’s all stirred together in the same paint.  There’s no one that I know on this planet who doesn’t have false hope, we all have false hope.  We all have our wishes, our unlikely things; we buy the lottery tickets.  It’s terrifically unlikely that anyone we know is going to win the lottery, but we all buy lottery tickets.  We all go gambling, we all do many, many things, it’s not a problem.  It’s accepted just as long as you’re taking it as a piece, but you’re willing to work on the reality of today, I’m fine with it.  To just say, “Okay, I want to walk, but I’m in a wheelchair today.  Fine.  What am I going to do?  I’m not just going to sit here and wait for my legs to move.  I’m going to decide to go back to school, or I’m going to do something.  I’m going to work on my strengthening, I’m going to read.  I’m going to try to benefit, I’m going to participate in my family’s activities, I’m going to pay attention to my kids.  I’m going to do something to move forward with my life.  Something that makes me feel better or more whole.”

How do you get people to understand their injury without giving up hope?
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