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What kinds of adaptations are available to help someone resume driving a spinal cord injury?

What kinds of adaptations are available to help someone resume driving a spinal cord injury?

Anne Bryden, OT

Occupational Therapist/Research Manager, Case Western University, Cleveland

Read Bio More Videos by Anne Bryden
Transcript
To resume driving, it’s really dependent on the level of your spinal cord injury. So, for people with higher cervical levels, quite often you’ll need to use a minivan. And to be able to have that ability, there’s usually a ramp where the door i... Show More

To resume driving, it’s really dependent on the level of your spinal cord injury. So, for people with higher cervical levels, quite often you’ll need to use a minivan. And to be able to have that ability, there’s usually a ramp where the door is so that you can get into the van and drive up to specialized controls that can help compensate for any lack of hand function that you may be experiencing from the spinal cord injury. So, smaller steering wheels are important because people need them to be able to use them with their maybe somewhat weaker shoulder but be able to get the full turning radius that they need to do. The other arm is often used for gas and brake. So essentially, you’re using your arm function to replace with what you can’t do with your legs any more.

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What kinds of adaptations are available to help someone resume driving a spinal cord injury?

Anne Bryden, OT

Occupational Therapist/Research Manager, Case Western University, Cleveland

More Videos by Anne Bryden
Transcriptadd

To resume driving, it’s really dependent on the level of your spinal cord injury. So, for people with higher cervical levels, quite often you’ll need to use a minivan. And to be able to have that ability, there’s usually a ramp where the door is so that you can get into the van and drive up to specialized controls that can help compensate for any lack of hand function that you may be experiencing from the spinal cord injury. So, smaller steering wheels are important because people need them to be able to use them with their maybe somewhat weaker shoulder but be able to get the full turning radius that they need to do. The other arm is often used for gas and brake. So essentially, you’re using your arm function to replace with what you can’t do with your legs any more.

What kinds of adaptations are available to help someone resume driving a spinal cord injury?
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