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What’s the best way to do daily skin inspections?

What’s the best way to do daily skin inspections?

Mary Zeigler, MS

Clinical Nurse Specialist, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago

Read Bio More Videos by Mary Zeigler
Transcript
To have a regular schedule of daily skin inspection.  In the morning, prior to getting dressed, is a good time; in the evening when you’re getting undressed is also a good time.  In between times, such as when you’re getting repositioned, if it... Show More

To have a regular schedule of daily skin inspection.  In the morning, prior to getting dressed, is a good time; in the evening when you’re getting undressed is also a good time.  In between times, such as when you’re getting repositioned, if it’s convenient, you can do assessments at that point.  The visual inspection is essential. Either the patient does it with a long-handled mirror, if they can functionally do that, or a designated person such as family or caregiver.  What you’re looking for, initially, is a color change in the skin-pigmentation.  With a pale-complexioned individual, it’s going to look reddish or pinkish.  With a darker-skinned individual, the area of injury will be a darker tone than their normal tone, which is very important to recognize.  In addition, other signs and symptoms can be again, pain, there may be some blistering, there may be a bruise appearance—bluish, purplish, blackish, brownish—there may be a texture consistency difference.  For example, the heel should feel as firm as the palm of your hand.  In the case of a suspected pressure injury, or a beginning pressure sore, it can become soft or even mushy; you can depress it with your finger tips.  So these are the initially, beginning signs.

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What’s the best way to do daily skin inspections?

Mary Zeigler, MS

Clinical Nurse Specialist, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago

More Videos by Mary Zeigler
Transcriptadd

To have a regular schedule of daily skin inspection.  In the morning, prior to getting dressed, is a good time; in the evening when you’re getting undressed is also a good time.  In between times, such as when you’re getting repositioned, if it’s convenient, you can do assessments at that point.  The visual inspection is essential. Either the patient does it with a long-handled mirror, if they can functionally do that, or a designated person such as family or caregiver.  What you’re looking for, initially, is a color change in the skin-pigmentation.  With a pale-complexioned individual, it’s going to look reddish or pinkish.  With a darker-skinned individual, the area of injury will be a darker tone than their normal tone, which is very important to recognize.  In addition, other signs and symptoms can be again, pain, there may be some blistering, there may be a bruise appearance—bluish, purplish, blackish, brownish—there may be a texture consistency difference.  For example, the heel should feel as firm as the palm of your hand.  In the case of a suspected pressure injury, or a beginning pressure sore, it can become soft or even mushy; you can depress it with your finger tips.  So these are the initially, beginning signs.

What’s the best way to do daily skin inspections?
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