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Jamie – How did you develop an understanding of the injury?

Jamie – How did you develop an understanding of the injury?

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When my accident first happened, I knew immediately that I was paralyzed, like I felt my legs go numb, and get very heavy. And I even told one of my friends who—no one else was hurt in my accident—but he was standing over me, and I even told him,... Show More

When my accident first happened, I knew immediately that I was paralyzed, like I felt my legs go numb, and get very heavy. And I even told one of my friends who—no one else was hurt in my accident—but he was standing over me, and I even told him, I said, “I’m paralyzed.” I didn’t even know what that word meant, you know, but I felt a heaviness, it was almost like my legs were wrapped in concrete, that kind of heavy. And I didn’t know this, but in the ambulance ride, they were doing the cotton swab and pricking your foot to see if you had any feeling. I didn’t know that they were doing that. But the first time I realized that it was real was, I was getting an MRI. They were doing some x-ray of me, and I was freezing, and I remember being so cold. And I went to put my hands under my legs, you know when you put your hands under to keep them warm, and they had taken my pants off. The nurses had taken my pants off and I didn’t realize it. I had corduroy pants on, I didn’t feel my pants, I felt my skin and it was at that moment I went, “oh, this is really real.” And when they came in, like my parents, and my youth pastor was there, and the doctor was there, and they came in to tell me. You know, I almost told them, I almost said “I know what this is, you don’t have to tell me.” So, I knew from the very beginning that I was paralyzed.

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Jamie – How did you develop an understanding of the injury?

Jamie

Injured in 1993 at age 17, paraplegic
More Videos by Jamie
Transcriptadd

When my accident first happened, I knew immediately that I was paralyzed, like I felt my legs go numb, and get very heavy. And I even told one of my friends who—no one else was hurt in my accident—but he was standing over me, and I even told him, I said, “I’m paralyzed.” I didn’t even know what that word meant, you know, but I felt a heaviness, it was almost like my legs were wrapped in concrete, that kind of heavy. And I didn’t know this, but in the ambulance ride, they were doing the cotton swab and pricking your foot to see if you had any feeling. I didn’t know that they were doing that. But the first time I realized that it was real was, I was getting an MRI. They were doing some x-ray of me, and I was freezing, and I remember being so cold. And I went to put my hands under my legs, you know when you put your hands under to keep them warm, and they had taken my pants off. The nurses had taken my pants off and I didn’t realize it. I had corduroy pants on, I didn’t feel my pants, I felt my skin and it was at that moment I went, “oh, this is really real.” And when they came in, like my parents, and my youth pastor was there, and the doctor was there, and they came in to tell me. You know, I almost told them, I almost said “I know what this is, you don’t have to tell me.” So, I knew from the very beginning that I was paralyzed.

Jamie – How did you develop an understanding of the injury?
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