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Ken – How did you develop an understanding of the injury?

Ken – How did you develop an understanding of the injury?

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It’s always disconcerting when you have all the doctors come in and look at you and shake their head and just kind of wander back out. You are like, “this isn’t encouraging at all.” But I knew I couldn’t move, I knew that my legs were just ... Show More

It’s always disconcerting when you have all the doctors come in and look at you and shake their head and just kind of wander back out. You are like, “this isn’t encouraging at all.” But I knew I couldn’t move, I knew that my legs were just lying there, and I was feeling horrible. And so, they were able to do emergency surgery on my heart, correct what was happening, but because of that, I ended up with a spinal cord stroke, and my legs never came back so they stayed paralyzed for the remainder of the time. So, it was very difficult for the doctors when they came in and said, “you’re not going to walk again.” And they warned my wife in the hospital, in the emergency room that I probably wouldn’t walk. I wasn’t too worried about that, I just wanted to live because I thought I was going to die. So, to the fact that I was paralyzed was fine with me because I was alive and still moving around a little bit.

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Ken – How did you develop an understanding of the injury?

Ken

Injured in 2013 at age 55, paraplegic
More Videos by Ken
Transcriptadd

It’s always disconcerting when you have all the doctors come in and look at you and shake their head and just kind of wander back out. You are like, “this isn’t encouraging at all.” But I knew I couldn’t move, I knew that my legs were just lying there, and I was feeling horrible. And so, they were able to do emergency surgery on my heart, correct what was happening, but because of that, I ended up with a spinal cord stroke, and my legs never came back so they stayed paralyzed for the remainder of the time. So, it was very difficult for the doctors when they came in and said, “you’re not going to walk again.” And they warned my wife in the hospital, in the emergency room that I probably wouldn’t walk. I wasn’t too worried about that, I just wanted to live because I thought I was going to die. So, to the fact that I was paralyzed was fine with me because I was alive and still moving around a little bit.

Ken – How did you develop an understanding of the injury?
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