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Molly – How did you develop an understanding of the injury?

Molly – How did you develop an understanding of the injury?

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Um, slowly. I didn’t ask that many questions at the beginning.  I didn’t know what a spinal cord injury was.  And they told me I was paralyzed, and I said, “Am I going to be able to walk again?”  And, I remember... Show More

Um, slowly. I didn’t ask that many questions at the beginning.  I didn’t know what a spinal cord injury was.  And they told me I was paralyzed, and I said, “Am I going to be able to walk again?”  And, I remember my mom said, “Honey, I’m not sure, I don’t know.”  After that, I didn’t really ask a lot of questions.  From the get-go, I didn’t really understand what it meant to have a spinal cord injury, and all the things that it was going to affect.  And I think that actually made it easier at the beginning, because I wasn’t looking really far ahead in terms of, “How am I going to college?” and “How am I going to have a family?” and “How am I going to do all these really difficult things from a wheelchair?”  I just kind of, in my head was like, “Oh, I’ll be better by next summer.  If not next summer, maybe the year after. I certainly would be better by the end of high school.”  So, it took me a long time to really internalize all the things my spinal cord injury was going to affect.  So, I think I came to understanding really slowly.  I think it was a good thing.  I think part of the reason it was really difficult for my mom, my dad and brothers is because they understood what this was going to mean, and all the things it was going to affect.  Whereas, I really wasn’t looking that far forward, and I think that helped me deal with what was going on in the immediate future and present a lot better, because I wasn’t as overwhelmed by what I was going to have to face later down the road.

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Molly – How did you develop an understanding of the injury?

Molly

Injured in 2005 at age 15, quadriplegic
More Videos by Molly
Transcriptadd

Um, slowly. I didn’t ask that many questions at the beginning.  I didn’t know what a spinal cord injury was.  And they told me I was paralyzed, and I said, “Am I going to be able to walk again?”  And, I remember my mom said, “Honey, I’m not sure, I don’t know.”  After that, I didn’t really ask a lot of questions.  From the get-go, I didn’t really understand what it meant to have a spinal cord injury, and all the things that it was going to affect.  And I think that actually made it easier at the beginning, because I wasn’t looking really far ahead in terms of, “How am I going to college?” and “How am I going to have a family?” and “How am I going to do all these really difficult things from a wheelchair?”  I just kind of, in my head was like, “Oh, I’ll be better by next summer.  If not next summer, maybe the year after. I certainly would be better by the end of high school.”  So, it took me a long time to really internalize all the things my spinal cord injury was going to affect.  So, I think I came to understanding really slowly.  I think it was a good thing.  I think part of the reason it was really difficult for my mom, my dad and brothers is because they understood what this was going to mean, and all the things it was going to affect.  Whereas, I really wasn’t looking that far forward, and I think that helped me deal with what was going on in the immediate future and present a lot better, because I wasn’t as overwhelmed by what I was going to have to face later down the road.

Molly – How did you develop an understanding of the injury?
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