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What are some “low tech” devices that can make homes more accessible?

What are some “low tech” devices that can make homes more accessible?

Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS

Program Specialist, Spinal Cord Injury Program, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago

Read Bio More Videos by Kim Eberhardt Muir
Transcript
There’s a lot of low-tech things out there that you can do to make your home more accessible.  They don’t cost a lot, but they make a world a difference.  Touch lamps, that’s another great thing that you can use at night—doesn’t take a lo... Show More

There’s a lot of low-tech things out there that you can do to make your home more accessible.  They don’t cost a lot, but they make a world a difference.  Touch lamps, that’s another great thing that you can use at night—doesn’t take a lot of manipulation, very easy to use.  Other things—pull-out drawers in the kitchen, very easy to do.  You can also make what’s called a dummy door, or a pull-out work surface, so you maybe can’t reach the counters, they’re a little high in the kitchen, but you can use one of these at a lower level where a drawer would be, that can be your meal preparation space.  The side-by-side refrigerators, I think, are optimal for wheelchair, or a freezer on the bottom versus the top.  I think that makes things a lot easier.  I like to have a call system—especially for someone that’s a higher-level injury—in the bedroom.  A call system will enable them to call for help, and someone will always hear them.  Especially on a ventilator, or for someone who has a trach, tracheostomy, so they may not have a voice that’s not quite as loud, so having that feature, even a simple baby monitor will work; it’s a wonderful thing to have.  Other things—I think hardwood floors are good to have; it makes it a lot easier with not just odor, with mobility, and things like that.  Some people will put corner protectors on their walls, especially with a power wheelchair.  People tend to, in a smaller environment, hit things a little bit more often, so darker color walls, or having those corner protectors are nice for a manual wheelchair user.

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What are some “low tech” devices that can make homes more accessible?

Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS

Program Specialist, Spinal Cord Injury Program, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago

More Videos by Kim Eberhardt Muir
Transcriptadd

There’s a lot of low-tech things out there that you can do to make your home more accessible.  They don’t cost a lot, but they make a world a difference.  Touch lamps, that’s another great thing that you can use at night—doesn’t take a lot of manipulation, very easy to use.  Other things—pull-out drawers in the kitchen, very easy to do.  You can also make what’s called a dummy door, or a pull-out work surface, so you maybe can’t reach the counters, they’re a little high in the kitchen, but you can use one of these at a lower level where a drawer would be, that can be your meal preparation space.  The side-by-side refrigerators, I think, are optimal for wheelchair, or a freezer on the bottom versus the top.  I think that makes things a lot easier.  I like to have a call system—especially for someone that’s a higher-level injury—in the bedroom.  A call system will enable them to call for help, and someone will always hear them.  Especially on a ventilator, or for someone who has a trach, tracheostomy, so they may not have a voice that’s not quite as loud, so having that feature, even a simple baby monitor will work; it’s a wonderful thing to have.  Other things—I think hardwood floors are good to have; it makes it a lot easier with not just odor, with mobility, and things like that.  Some people will put corner protectors on their walls, especially with a power wheelchair.  People tend to, in a smaller environment, hit things a little bit more often, so darker color walls, or having those corner protectors are nice for a manual wheelchair user.

What are some “low tech” devices that can make homes more accessible?
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