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Billy – Did you ever consider suicide?

Billy – Did you ever consider suicide?

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Sure. I mean, you love your children so much. And Talbot’s injury was very severe. He had a lot of problems. You know, I think the average stay here is like 45 days and for him to be here at six months—we kept running into roadblocks getting him ... Show More

Sure. I mean, you love your children so much. And Talbot’s injury was very severe. He had a lot of problems. You know, I think the average stay here is like 45 days and for him to be here at six months—we kept running into roadblocks getting him in the rehab program and it really was just drawn out. I got very down because you know I didn’t know where he was going to get the drive to live. I knew he didn’t want to live. He had told me that he didn’t want to live at one point, he didn’t care if he woke up in the morning. And one of the people that was working at the Shepherd’s Center at the time, he was the vice president, he came to me, he said, “Billy, I think I know what you’re doing or what you’re thinking.” He said, “Look, if you do that you’re no help to your son.” And he was the one that made me see the light of saying, “hey, who’s going to help him if I’m not here to help him?” His mother, but she sure can’t do it all on her own. So, after I got past that point, and I got depressed when I went back home after being over here for three months, it wasn’t a matter of thinking about suicide. It was, I was just down, and I needed to find a way to get back up. And that’s when I went to the company I was working for and found a psychiatrist to go to, to talk with. They had a program and I knew that I had to get stronger for him, not only for myself but for him. And I couldn’t see leaving and letting him fight that battle by himself.

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Billy – Did you ever consider suicide?

Billy

Son injured in 2004 at age 18, quadriplegic
More Videos by Billy
Transcriptadd

Sure. I mean, you love your children so much. And Talbot’s injury was very severe. He had a lot of problems. You know, I think the average stay here is like 45 days and for him to be here at six months—we kept running into roadblocks getting him in the rehab program and it really was just drawn out. I got very down because you know I didn’t know where he was going to get the drive to live. I knew he didn’t want to live. He had told me that he didn’t want to live at one point, he didn’t care if he woke up in the morning. And one of the people that was working at the Shepherd’s Center at the time, he was the vice president, he came to me, he said, “Billy, I think I know what you’re doing or what you’re thinking.” He said, “Look, if you do that you’re no help to your son.” And he was the one that made me see the light of saying, “hey, who’s going to help him if I’m not here to help him?” His mother, but she sure can’t do it all on her own. So, after I got past that point, and I got depressed when I went back home after being over here for three months, it wasn’t a matter of thinking about suicide. It was, I was just down, and I needed to find a way to get back up. And that’s when I went to the company I was working for and found a psychiatrist to go to, to talk with. They had a program and I knew that I had to get stronger for him, not only for myself but for him. And I couldn’t see leaving and letting him fight that battle by himself.

Billy – Did you ever consider suicide?
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