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What are the most difficult caregiving problems for families living with spinal cord injury?

What are the most difficult caregiving problems for families living with spinal cord injury?

Kathy Hulse, MSW

Social Worker/Outpatient Counselor, Craig Hospital, Colorado

Read Bio More Videos by Kathy Hulse
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When a caregiver is so tired and has no other place to turn, and has no money, and no ability to hire out for other caregiving resources, and no other family to help them out and they still have to provide care for their loved one—and the loved one... Show More

When a caregiver is so tired and has no other place to turn, and has no money, and no ability to hire out for other caregiving resources, and no other family to help them out and they still have to provide care for their loved one—and the loved one, the person that’s injured, knows that, and you just see the family struggling so hard. Your heart just breaks for them, because you know it’s hurting on both ends. I tell folks it’s tough on both sides, it’s not a contest, it’s hard on both ends. It’s hard for the loved one, it’s hard for the person that’s injured and it’s hard for the caregiver. It’s just a different process to go through. You want to make it better for the person that’s been injured; it’s hard to be the helpless one and not be able to solve that. It’s also hard for the person who is injured to see the other person struggling to be the caregiver, to have to do all the extra chores around the house—to mow the yard, to clean the house, to run all the errands, do all the stuff you used to be able to do but now you’re injured and you can’t do all those things. To maybe have to work extra hours to pay the bills. So, it’s hard on both ends, and it’s just a tough, tough process. And I don’t have the answer to that, I think just try to pull in outside help, ask for more help if you can. But sometimes, it’s not there.

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What are the most difficult caregiving problems for families living with spinal cord injury?

Kathy Hulse, MSW

Social Worker/Outpatient Counselor, Craig Hospital, Colorado

More Videos by Kathy Hulse
Transcriptadd

When a caregiver is so tired and has no other place to turn, and has no money, and no ability to hire out for other caregiving resources, and no other family to help them out and they still have to provide care for their loved one—and the loved one, the person that’s injured, knows that, and you just see the family struggling so hard. Your heart just breaks for them, because you know it’s hurting on both ends. I tell folks it’s tough on both sides, it’s not a contest, it’s hard on both ends. It’s hard for the loved one, it’s hard for the person that’s injured and it’s hard for the caregiver. It’s just a different process to go through. You want to make it better for the person that’s been injured; it’s hard to be the helpless one and not be able to solve that. It’s also hard for the person who is injured to see the other person struggling to be the caregiver, to have to do all the extra chores around the house—to mow the yard, to clean the house, to run all the errands, do all the stuff you used to be able to do but now you’re injured and you can’t do all those things. To maybe have to work extra hours to pay the bills. So, it’s hard on both ends, and it’s just a tough, tough process. And I don’t have the answer to that, I think just try to pull in outside help, ask for more help if you can. But sometimes, it’s not there.

What are the most difficult caregiving problems for families living with spinal cord injury?
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