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What are the most important elements of an accessible home environment for someone with a spinal cord injury?

What are the most important elements of an accessible home environment for someone with a spinal cord injury?

Patti Rogers, SW

Social Worker/Executive Director, Arkansas Spinal Cord Injury Commission, Little Rock

Read Bio More Videos by Patti Rogers
Transcript
Well number one you need to be able to get into it—I would say a ramp to me is vital. Number two, we try to make sure that they can move from room-to-room-to-room with the greatest ease possible. That could be widening doors; if they have a sunken ... Show More

Well number one you need to be able to get into it—I would say a ramp to me is vital. Number two, we try to make sure that they can move from room-to-room-to-room with the greatest ease possible. That could be widening doors; if they have a sunken living room, it could be having a transition ramp in the home. As far as the kitchen goes, a lot of times it’s a matter of lowering cabinets, making their sink accessible enough to where they can get up to the kitchen. I know a lot of times we have assisted contractors in making the stove more accessible because you don’t want to turn on the burners from the back of the stove; you want to have them in the front. A lot of times those are things that contractors really don’t think about unless they’ve done a lot of ADA building.

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What are the most important elements of an accessible home environment for someone with a spinal cord injury?

Patti Rogers, SW

Social Worker/Executive Director, Arkansas Spinal Cord Injury Commission, Little Rock

More Videos by Patti Rogers
Transcriptadd

Well number one you need to be able to get into it—I would say a ramp to me is vital. Number two, we try to make sure that they can move from room-to-room-to-room with the greatest ease possible. That could be widening doors; if they have a sunken living room, it could be having a transition ramp in the home. As far as the kitchen goes, a lot of times it’s a matter of lowering cabinets, making their sink accessible enough to where they can get up to the kitchen. I know a lot of times we have assisted contractors in making the stove more accessible because you don’t want to turn on the burners from the back of the stove; you want to have them in the front. A lot of times those are things that contractors really don’t think about unless they’ve done a lot of ADA building.

What are the most important elements of an accessible home environment for someone with a spinal cord injury?
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