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What are the most important safety issues in the bathroom?

What are the most important safety issues in the bathroom?

Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS

Program Specialist, Spinal Cord Injury Program, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago

Read Bio More Videos by Kim Eberhardt Muir
Transcript
Because people with spinal cord injury have impaired sensation, there’s a few things they need to think about—as far as the pipes underneath the sink can cause burns.  So, we tell people, you know, when you’re using a wall-moun... Show More

Because people with spinal cord injury have impaired sensation, there’s a few things they need to think about—as far as the pipes underneath the sink can cause burns.  So, we tell people, you know, when you’re using a wall-mounted sink, for example—and that’s an accessible sink where you can just pull up underneath—make sure the pipes are insulated.  A radiator, any thing that is uncovered that produces heat like that is very dangerous for a person in a wheelchair.  And then thinking about things like anti-scald devices with a faucet, so the water never gets too hot for someone that cannot perceive hot and cold that well.  I always talk about lever door handles, that’s a real easy one.  A lot of people think, you know, “I don’t know if I’ll need that, I have pretty good hands.”  For some people, fine motor is an issue.  But, if you’re in a manual or power wheelchair and need to open a door, a lever door handle makes such a world a difference.  And then, things like motion-detection lights, things like that, so you’re safe when you use that ramp or lift.  When you enter your bathroom or bedroom, they automatically go on, you don’t have to manipulate something in the dark, especially if you have to do bowel or bladder care at night; it’s a nice thing to have.

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What are the most important safety issues in the bathroom?

Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS

Program Specialist, Spinal Cord Injury Program, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago

More Videos by Kim Eberhardt Muir
Transcriptadd

Because people with spinal cord injury have impaired sensation, there’s a few things they need to think about—as far as the pipes underneath the sink can cause burns.  So, we tell people, you know, when you’re using a wall-mounted sink, for example—and that’s an accessible sink where you can just pull up underneath—make sure the pipes are insulated.  A radiator, any thing that is uncovered that produces heat like that is very dangerous for a person in a wheelchair.  And then thinking about things like anti-scald devices with a faucet, so the water never gets too hot for someone that cannot perceive hot and cold that well.  I always talk about lever door handles, that’s a real easy one.  A lot of people think, you know, “I don’t know if I’ll need that, I have pretty good hands.”  For some people, fine motor is an issue.  But, if you’re in a manual or power wheelchair and need to open a door, a lever door handle makes such a world a difference.  And then, things like motion-detection lights, things like that, so you’re safe when you use that ramp or lift.  When you enter your bathroom or bedroom, they automatically go on, you don’t have to manipulate something in the dark, especially if you have to do bowel or bladder care at night; it’s a nice thing to have.

What are the most important safety issues in the bathroom?
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