close

Sue – What were the important milestones in rehabilitation?

Sue – What were the important milestones in rehabilitation?

More Videos by Sue
Transcript
We immediately just started trying little things to see what he could do, and not what he couldn't do; just little things at a time. And, once my son realized he could do these little things, he wanted to do it more and more. At the time of his a... Show More

We immediately just started trying little things to see what he could do, and not what he couldn't do; just little things at a time. And, once my son realized he could do these little things, he wanted to do it more and more. At the time of his accident he was 10, he'd ridden his horse for two years, he was eight years old with this horse, wonderful horse. And, that was one of the things that he cried about because he could not ride his horse anymore. I told him he could, my brother, who also rides horses, told him he could ride this horse, we would find a way. And, we just told him well, we have to do one step at a time. First, we need to get you so you can talk again, and you can be able to communicate with us at least a little bit. And, we have to get you so you can sit back up because it had been a while since he even able to sit up and it was just all these little steps and then finally probably after five, six, seven weeks he decided no, he was giving up. So, you know, he doesn't have control over his body, he can't move anything, and you're telling me I can get back on a horse. It's hard for a ten-year-old to see that, but once he saw his horse, that's all that he needed. And, he got out of the facility and I got a hold of the person I needed to get a hold of, and I took the horse to go see him. And, after that day, he decided he wanted to work really hard in physical therapy. And, he was back on his horse within three months after that.

Show Less
add

Sue – What were the important milestones in rehabilitation?

Sue

Son injured in 2004 at age 10, quadriplegic
More Videos by Sue
Transcriptadd

We immediately just started trying little things to see what he could do, and not what he couldn't do; just little things at a time. And, once my son realized he could do these little things, he wanted to do it more and more. At the time of his accident he was 10, he'd ridden his horse for two years, he was eight years old with this horse, wonderful horse. And, that was one of the things that he cried about because he could not ride his horse anymore. I told him he could, my brother, who also rides horses, told him he could ride this horse, we would find a way. And, we just told him well, we have to do one step at a time. First, we need to get you so you can talk again, and you can be able to communicate with us at least a little bit. And, we have to get you so you can sit back up because it had been a while since he even able to sit up and it was just all these little steps and then finally probably after five, six, seven weeks he decided no, he was giving up. So, you know, he doesn't have control over his body, he can't move anything, and you're telling me I can get back on a horse. It's hard for a ten-year-old to see that, but once he saw his horse, that's all that he needed. And, he got out of the facility and I got a hold of the person I needed to get a hold of, and I took the horse to go see him. And, after that day, he decided he wanted to work really hard in physical therapy. And, he was back on his horse within three months after that.

Sue – What were the important milestones in rehabilitation?
c
h
close