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Nick – How did you deal with the transition from hospital to home?

Nick – How did you deal with the transition from hospital to home?

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You have a lot of daily reminders of your past life, and of things you can no longer do. So for me it was, you know, seeing some of my old sports gear, and old pictures and videotapes of past gymnastics meets. So, it's like, it's a little bit... Show More

You have a lot of daily reminders of your past life, and of things you can no longer do. So for me it was, you know, seeing some of my old sports gear, and old pictures and videotapes of past gymnastics meets. So, it's like, it's a little bit of a shell shock when you first get home, and try to just kind of gather yourself, and just used to being back home and out of the hospital and if you an issue, you're kind of on your own. You can make a phone call, but if you hit the ground here at home there's not five therapists to get you back up there, it's me and my mom. So it's definitely a crash course in being on your own, and you also have to deal with the whole accepting and understanding and dealing with the injury, which you didn't really have to face in the hospital. When you see all of your old stuff, and your old friends and when all of the family comes over and say," you're doing a great job," you know, they leave and you're still like, "nothing's changed, I'm still in a chair."

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Nick – How did you deal with the transition from hospital to home?

Nick

Injured in 1995 at age 17, quadriplegic
More Videos by Nick
Transcriptadd

You have a lot of daily reminders of your past life, and of things you can no longer do. So for me it was, you know, seeing some of my old sports gear, and old pictures and videotapes of past gymnastics meets. So, it's like, it's a little bit of a shell shock when you first get home, and try to just kind of gather yourself, and just used to being back home and out of the hospital and if you an issue, you're kind of on your own. You can make a phone call, but if you hit the ground here at home there's not five therapists to get you back up there, it's me and my mom. So it's definitely a crash course in being on your own, and you also have to deal with the whole accepting and understanding and dealing with the injury, which you didn't really have to face in the hospital. When you see all of your old stuff, and your old friends and when all of the family comes over and say," you're doing a great job," you know, they leave and you're still like, "nothing's changed, I'm still in a chair."

Nick – How did you deal with the transition from hospital to home?
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